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Forward Mid Directory 2020

Forward Mid Directory 2020, The links above open the pages selected. we hope that you find it enjoyable and useful. If you think Forward Mid has missed something out of this directory we apologise for this please contact us so we can make sure it is included in the next directory. Please inform Forward Mid in one of these three ways:
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Forward Mid,
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EH22 1AE.
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Local information section logoV.O.C.A.L & Wee Breaks


Vocal LogoVocal stands for "Voices Of Carers Across the Lothian's"


Vocal provide information to unpaid carers.


VOCAL provides information to unpaid carers. An unpaid carer is a person who looks after a relative, neighbour or friend who needs support because of age, physical or learning disability, long-term condition or illness, mental health problems or drug or alcohol issues.


Providing care can range from visiting every day to make sure someone is okay, doing a weekly shop for someone, to being there 24 hours a day and providing personal care.


VOCAL provides:

  • Practical support on issues such as taking on a caring role, accessing services, your health and well-being, welfare benefits and managing household bills, legal matters and specialist services,
  • Support to take a break from your caring role,
  • Access to training and events and social groups,
  • Counselling,
  • Support if you are affected by someone else’s drug or alcohol use.

What is an Adult Carer Support Plan


You can ask Midlothian Council Social Work or VOCAL for an Adult Carer Support Plan. The plan sets out any needs you have as a carer and how they will be met. Any carer can request an ACSP, regardless of the age of the person they care for, number of hours, type of caring, or regularity of their caring role.


More information on Adult Carer Support Plans can be found in the leaflet available from VOCAL Midlothian.


Wee Breaks


Becoming a carer affects all carers in numerous ways. Whether you felt you had a choice about it or were thrown into because of circumstances there is no doubt that caring can be difficult at times. You may appreciate the person you care for but the daily responsibility of attending to their needs may mean that your own needs are often neglected.


Remember when you had time to meet people, go to the cinema or accomplish whatever it was you managed to enjoy accomplishing? Leisure time is the first thing that disappears for carers and the last thing they possess time for and yet it is one of the best stress relievers.


Wee Breaks are encouraging you take some ‘time out’ for yourself and assist you find and create the right break for you – from a few hours to a few weeks. We can spend time with you to think about what would be best for you and how to achieve this. Times are changing with the introduction of self-directed support, and Wee Breaks can assist you to make this happen.


Short Breaks Funds


short breaks fund Logo in Blue Text Wee Break Midlothian administer two funds that you may be eligible to apply for to support you to take a break from your caring role.


You can apply for anything that would give you a break from your caring role, for example:

  • A shed so YOU can continue your hobbies at home,
  • Someone to spend time with the person you care for while you go to a class or group,
  • Financial assistance to help YOU set up an activity, break or holiday with friends and/ or family,
  • Sports equipment to allow YOU to take part in regular activities.

VOCAL can only assist carers with application to the above funds if:-

  • The person YOU care for lives in Midlothian and IS NOT in long-term care,
  • Financially YOU are unable to fund the break yourself,
  • Social Services cannot fund the break, ie: we are unable to fund services that are provided by Midlothian Council and cannot offer financial assistance when the cared for is in residential care,
  • The break will give YOU time off from your caring role as the main carer for a friend or family member,
  • YOU have been referred to VOCAL from a practitioner and discussed how a break from your caring role will benefit YOU.

All applications are submitted to a panel who meet on the last Wednesday of the month. For more information and to download a form visit: weebreak.org/shortbreaksfunds/


Contact Details:


VOCAL Midlothian, Carers Centre,
30/1 Hardengreen Estate,
Eskbank EH22 3NX.
www.vocal.org.uk The office is open Monday to Friday 09:00 hrs – 17:00 hrs.

Telephone logo 0131-663 6869

Email: email symbol midlothian@vocal.org.uk

Website: www.vocal.org.uk/midlothian

Website: www.weebreaks.org

facebook logo Facebook.com/MidlothianCarers


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Local information section logoVolunteer Centre Midlothian logo


Volunteer Midlothian is the first point of contact for anyone who wants to find out more about volunteering in Midlothian. We can offer you a free, confidential and informal appointment where our advisors can help you:

  • Explore your interests and motivations for volunteering
  • Make an informed choice about the different opportunities Volunteer Centre Midlothian have available
  • Search and select information on over 200 local volunteering opportunities
  • Set up a meeting with the opportunity of your choice or arrange for them to get in touch with you

You can also browse the wide range of opportunities on our website.


Volunteer Midlothian also runs a number of volunteer-led projects which help people develop their skills and confidence. These include:

A group of older people learning about tablet computersOnline which provides IT tuition to groups of older people and vulnerable adults who wish to develop their digital skills and increase their social connections. Groups take place at home (for those who are housebound) or in local community settings including libraries.


We also offer supported volunteering opportunities for young people aged 14-20 through our Transform Project.


For more information contact:


Telephone logo 0131 660 1216
Email: email symbol info@volunteermidlothian.org.uk
Website: www.volunteermidlothian.org.uk


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Forward Mid Newsletter

National section logoBenefits

Employment and Support Allowance (ESAEmployment and Support Allowance)


ESAEmployment and Support Allowance is an allowance for people claiming benefit on the grounds of incapacity. It is an integrated contribution based and income related allowances. It can lead to intensive work focussed support based on Work Programme or Jobcentre Plus offer provision. Contribution based ESAEmployment and Support Allowance is payable if you have paid or been credited with enough class 1 or class 2 National Insurance contributions in the relevant tax year. Income related ESAEmployment and Support Allowance is payable if you do not have enough money coming in. You can claim income related ESAEmployment and Support Allowance for:- you and your partner; some housing costs and special needs. For example, if you or a member of your family have a disability.


ESAEmployment and Support Allowance does not include money for children or qualifying young persons. You can claim Child Tax Credit.


A claim to ESAEmployment and Support Allowance will involve a Work Capability Assessment. There can be 2 parts to this assessment. Initially, you will complete and return form ESA50. This form asks for details of medical professional support you have, medications you are prescribed and how your health affects you on a daily basis. This is usually followed by a face to face medical assessment. If you don’t fill in and return the form or take part in the medical assessment, your benefit could be stopped. Everyone must go through the Work Capability Assessment although not everyone will be medically examined.


The Work Capability Assessment will determine whether you have Limited Capability for Work and determine whether you should be placed in the Work Related Activity Group or the Support Group. If placed in the Work Related Activity Group you will be required to take part in work focussed interviews and undertake Work Related Activity. This interview will initially take place in your local jobcentre and will involve a discussion on ways to return to work. This could include volunteering, Permitted Work, C.V. Preparation and Interview Techniques, information on local support or a referral to the Work Programme.


If placed in the Support Group you are not required to take part in interviews or undertake Work Related Activity. However, you can voluntarily access support to return to work.


ESAEmployment and Support Allowance is paid at an assessment rate for the first 13 weeks or until after the initial Work Capability Assessment. You will then be moved on to the Main Phase and an additional component is paid. The Work Related Activity Component is paid in return for participating in work related interviews and agreeing an Action Plan. People who receive the Support Component are not required to have Work-focussed Interviews or undertake Work Related Activity but can volunteer.


Special rules apply to terminally ill people (Have a progressive disease and are not expected to live for more than another 6 months.). ESAEmployment and Support Allowance customers will automatically be placed in the Support Group. Terminally ill customers should apply for DLAPDisability Living Allowance as soon as possible.


To claim ESAEmployment and Support Allowance, you can phone Telephone logo 0800 055 6688. If you are unable to use the telephone or need additional help to make a claim, contact the Jobcentre to make an appointment. If you have speech or hearing difficulties you can contact us by using textphone Signing Symbol 0800 023 48 88.


disabled people entitle to Personal Independence Payment


Personal Independence Payment (PIPPersonal Independence Payment)


PIPPersonal Independence Payment is a benefit to help disabled people live full, active and independent lives. PIPPersonal Independence Payment is based on how their health condition or disability affects them individually.


PIPPersonal Independence Payment has replaced Disability Living Allowance for working age adults. DLAPDisability Living Allowance for children isn’t changing, but they need to claim PIPPersonal Independence Payment when they reach 16. DLAPDisability Living Allowance for those over 65 isn’t affected. PIPPersonal Independence Payment will help towards some of the extra costs arising from a long-term condition. (Ill health or disability expected to last 12 months or longer.)


PIPPersonal Independence Payment is a non-means tested and non-taxable cash benefit which people can spend in a way that best suits them. You can get PIPPersonal Independence Payment whether you work or not, therefore it can also help people move into and stay in work.


Claims to PIPPersonal Independence Payment are started over the phone to gather basic information. You can ask someone to help with the call but you must be present during the call to help answer security questions. A form will then be sent out for more information about how your health condition or disability affects you.


The claim process includes an assessment by a health professional. Most people will have a face to face consultation. Reviews of an award will be done at appropriate intervals depending on how likely it is for your condition or impairment to change.


There are 2 components to PIPPersonal Independence Payment – Daily Living and Mobility needs. Each component can be paid at a standard or enhanced rate. At April 2018 the weekly rates are –


Daily Living

Standard       £58.70 
Enhanced      £87.65 


Mobility

Standard       £23.20 
Enhanced      £61.20


More information on PIPPersonal Independence Payment can be found at Personal Independence Payment (PIPPersonal Independence Payment) on the gov.uk web site. The telephone number to make a new claim is Telephone logo 0800 917 2222.


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National section logocontactScotland-BSL


contactSCOTLAND-BSL is a Scottish Government service that connects deaf BSL users throughout Scotland through an online BSL interpreting video relay service (VRS) with all of Scotland’s public authorities and voluntary organisations (Third Sector) and now beyond.


VRS for all – from March 2019 contactSCOTLAND-BSL now provides VRS For All. This now means that Deaf BSL users can contact any service that relies on telephone contact with their service users or customers. This includes public, third and private sectors within Scotland.


With 1 in 6 of the population being deaf, we provide an easy and flexible way of interacting with deaf BSL users who use and access your services. Deaf people can contact you and of course you can contact deaf people.


contactSCOTLAND-BSL is Scotland wide/cross-service and brought to you by Sign Language Interactions.


You have to register to use the either of the Apps


contactscotland-bsl.org/
Telephone logo0333 344 7712
Hard of Hearing and signing symbol 0797 084 8868
Email: email symbol info@contactscotland-bsl.org
Twitter: Twitter Logo twitter.com/ContactScotland
Facebook: Facebook logo facebook.com/contactScotland


Contact Scotland Logo

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National section logoCinema Exhibitors’ Association Card.

The Cinema Exhibitors’ Association Card. This is a national card that can be used to verify that the holder is entitled to one free ticket for a person accompanying them to the cinema. Terms and Condition of use apply.


To apply for the card, you will need to meet one or more of the following criteria:


a) Be in receipt of Personal Independence Payment, or Armed Forces Independence Payment.
b) Be a registered blind person.


The card is valid for 1 year from the date of issue.


Application forms are available from cinemas across the UK supporting this card. Also available on the Internet at www.ceacard.co.uk/apply and apply online
A processing fee of £6.00 is chargeable per card. This is to be sent along with the completed application


If you have any difficulty, please contact Cinema Exhibitors’ Association at the address below:


LogoThe Card Network
Network House
St Ives Way
Sandycroft
CH5 2QS
Email: email symbol info@ceacard.co.uk
Telephone logo 01244 526 016


Local Cinemas participating in this scheme are;


Cineworld Edinburgh
 cineworld Logo Fountain Park,
130/3 Dundee Street,
Edinburgh, EH11 1AF
Telephone logo 0330 333 4444
www.cineworld.co.uk


Dominion Cinema
Dominion Cinema Logo 18 Newbattle terrace,
Edinburgh, EH10 4RT
Telephone logo 0131 447 4771
www.dominioncinema.co.uk


Filmhouse
Filmhouse Logo88 Lothian Road,
Edinburgh, EH3 6PD
Telephone logo 0131 228 2688
www.filmhousecinema.com


Odeon Edinburgh
120 Wester Hailes Road,
Westside Plaza,
Odeon LogoEdinburgh, EH14 3HR

118 Lothian Road,
Edinburgh, EH3 8BG

Edinburgh Fort Kinnaird
Newcraighall, Edinburgh, EH15 3RD
Telephone logo 0800 138 3315 Accessibility Helpline
www.odeon.co.uk


Vue Cinemas
Ocean Terminal
Ocean Drive,
Edinburgh EH6 6JJ

Vue Logo Omni Centre
Omni, Greenside,
Edinburgh, EH1 3AT

Livingstone
McArthur Glen Designer Outlet,
Almondvale Avenue,
Livingstone, EH54 6QX
Telephone logo 0345 308 4620 Accessibility Helpline
www.myvue.com


Making a booking online with a CEA card is different for each cinema’s website, Odeon requires you to register before use, Vue please book on accessibility helpline or in cinema.


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Disability Information Scotland

Disability Information Scotland logoDisability Information Scotland work with disabled people, their families, friends, carers and people who work in the sector.


Disability Information Scotland Vision


Sharing information, enabling change. Disability Information Scotland enable positive change by sharing information on disability when people need it, in a way they want it.


Mission Statement:


We provide reliable, accurate and accessible information throughout Scotland. We develop creative partnerships with other agencies to ensure information is widely distributed, accessible to all and has a positive impact on the lives of disabled people, their families, friends and carers and the people who work with them. We work with people to find out what information they need and how they would like it provided.

Values

Our values inspire and inform all that we do:

  • Care about people;
  • Strive to provide a high quality, tailored, person-centred service;
  • Take a positive approach in all our work;
  • Subscribe to the social model of disability;
  • Are open to, and encourage and support, new and interesting ideas and ways of working;
  • Believe in the importance of building meaningful relationships with everyone we encounter.

Disability Information Scotland logo

Disability Information Scotland,
2nd Floor,
5 Rose Street,
Edinburgh, EH2 2PR
Telephone logo 0300 323 9961
Website: www.disabilityscot.org.uk/
Email: email symbol info@disabilityscot.org.uk


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Hello

National section logoDisabled Living Foundation


Disabled Living Foundation LogoThe Disabled Living Foundation (DLF) is the UK’s leading source of expert advice and information about all types of daily living equipment for older and disabled people and their families and carers.


DLF’s advice and product information allows individuals and relatives to make informed decisions and relevant lifestyle changes – all of which can help an individual remain independent in their home for longer, and provide the carer with peace of mind.


Whether you’re finding certain tasks a bit more difficult as you get older, you have a disability yourself, or you know someone in this situation, DLF can help.


With a huge range of equipment available, sometimes it can be hard to know where to start.


  • How do you know what is available?
  • How do you know what is right for you?
  • Where do you go to buy equipment?
  • How do you know if a supplier is reputable?

DLF provides the answers to all these questions. Our comprehensive database, listing over 10,000 daily living aids, allows you to research and compare relevant products and read unbiased information about equipment before contacting suppliers.


In addition to our equipment and supplier information, we have a wide range of fact sheets to help with everything from choosing a mobility scooter to assisting someone with eating. Written by occupational therapists, they identify easier ways of doing tasks, which equipment might help and when to ask for a professional assessment.


For individuals who are aware of their difficulties but are not sure which equipment may help them, try DLF’s online self-help guide, AskSARA. By selecting a topic and answering a few questions a free personalised report is produced, offering tailored advice on ways to help with daily activities, as well as a comprehensive list of products and suppliers to browse through.


For more information visit:

If you need any further assistance or advice about daily living aids, our Helpline is open 10am-4pm,
Monday to Friday. Telephone logo 0300 999 0004.
Calls will be charged at local rate.
Email: email symbol info@dlf.org.uk


Disabled Living Foundation is Part of Shaw Trust


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National section logoEuan’s Guide

Euans Guide Logo all text in light greenWe all navigate the world in different ways. Euan’s Guide makes it easier for disabled people to find great places to go. We all want to get out there and enjoy life, and having good quality disabled access information reduces unnecessary hassle, inspires confidence and removes fear of the unknown.


Euansguide.com is the disabled access review site where disabled people, their family, friends and carers can find and share reviews on the accessibility of venues around the UK and beyond. The site is an invaluable tool for everything from planning a day out, to picking a last-minute place for coffee or lunch.


Euan’s Guide believe in making the world more accessible one review at a time. There are now thousands of disabled access reviews and listing on Euan’s Guide. With good accessibility information being so hard to find, one review is often enough to encourage others to visit. Euan’s Guide is opening the door for more people to find new and exciting places to go. Reviews are also sent to venue owners, and this can be a positive and powerful opportunity for education and change.


The charity was founded in 2013 by Euan MacDonald MBE, a powerchair user and his sister Kiki after Euan was diagnosed with Motor Neurone Disease and a lack of disabled access made everyday experiences stressful. By breaking down the barriers of exclusion with the help of other people in the same situation, Euan’s Guide hopes to give everyone the freedom to explore.


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National section logoHelp with Housing Adaptations

Midlothian Council Community Care Service offers assessments to help people with disabilities to be as independent as possible in daily living tasks at home.


The outcome of the assessment may lead to a recommendation for a major adaptation. Assessments for these are normally provided by Community Care Occupational Therapists. The aim is to support people where, without a major adaptation to their property, the person would be unable to continue to live at home safely or independently.


Adapted shower with roll in roll out chairA major adaptation could be:

  • Replacing the bath with a walk in shower
  • A stairlift
  • A ramp for wheelchair access
  • Fitting lower work surfaces to make the kitchen more manageable

The recommendation for any adaptation relates to the disabled person’s current and long-term needs and links to the anticipated course of their impairment. The needs of the carers will also be considered. Decisions about whether to support an adaptation will take into account the benefits to the disabled person’s independence and support to carers over the long term. Sometimes an adaptation to your home is not feasible and the only way to meet your long term needs would be to move to another property. The Occupational Therapist will assist you to explore all your options.


Funding

Funding for major adaptations depends on the ownership of the home. If the disabled person is an owner occupier, or tenant in private rented property, a Home Improvement Grant may be available towards the cost of an adaptation.


If the person lives in council or housing association property the adaptation will normally be funded by the landlord.


The minimum home improvement grant you will get is 80% of the total cost. If you are on certain benefits then a grant could be 100%.
Before an application for a home improvement grant is submitted, an Occupational Therapist from the Community Care Service must be consulted and agree the work, and written documentation obtained identifying the relevant work.


This process is further outlined in the Scheme of Assistance available from Environmental Health and available on the Midlothian Council website. This download has been removed please search www.midlothian.gov.uk/ for more information


Contact Midlothian Council:

If you would like an appointment to discuss your situation or about a relative or friend,
contact us on Telephone logo 0131 271 3900 during office hours: Monday - Thursday 9:00-5:00 Friday 9:00-3:30
Adults and Community Care (Adult Services)
Fairfield House,
8 Lothian Road,
Dalkeith,
EH22 3AA
Telephone logo 0131-271-3900
E-mail: swccenquiries@midlothian.gov.uk


You can get more information from:

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Hello

National section logoHousing Housing Options Scotland logo Options Scotland


Housing Options Scotland was established in 1997 to provide a unique public access service to all disabled people throughout Scotland. Housing Options Scotland does not directly provide housing, what Housing Options Scotland does provide is detailed information and advice that will enable you to find the right home for you. Housing Options Scotland’s main aim is to ensure that disabled people have access to suitable housing in the tenure of their choice and recognising that gaining access to owner-occupation remains problematic.


Housing Options Scotland has three main areas of activity. Firstly, we directly assist disabled people by advising them on, and supporting them through, the complex design, financial and legal processes involved in buying or renting a property. Secondly, we provide information, advice and training on housing and disability issues to the public, private and voluntary sectors to improve the service disabled people get. Finally, we raise the awareness of the problems disabled people face in relation to their housing and highlight the solutions and opportunities that exist.


Housing Options Scotland has a dedicated team of volunteers. These volunteers enable Housing Options Scotland as an organisation to learn about the housing problems disabled people face by directly assisting them, and using the knowledge we gain to effect changes in policies and practice.


Housing Options Scotland logoYou can contact Housing Options Scotland:
Housing Options Scotland
The Melting Pot,
5 Rose Street,
Edinburgh, EH2 2PR.
Telephone logo 0131 247 1400
www.housingoptionsscotland.org.uk


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National section logoInclusion Scotland

Independent Living in Scotland logoInclusion Scotland (IS) is a consortium of disability organisations, individual disabled people and social partners who share our aims. We work towards eradicating the barriers


  • physical
  • economic
  • cultural
  • attitudinal

which prevent disabled people being fully included in society.


Inclusion Scotland (IS) was founded in 2001, as a direct response to calls from the grass roots of the disability movement for a new national organisation. It is run by disabled people themselves for, as we have the experience of disability, we are best placed to speak out on the issues that are important to us and affect our daily lives. Already over 60 disability groups from throughout Scotland have joined in partnership with us.



OUR AIMS:

  • To ensure the views of disabled people are heard and taken seriously by policy makers and to keep open the lines of communication.
  • To be a proactive rather than a reactive organisation.
  • To raise public awareness of social inclusion issues including the barriers – physical or social – society erects which disable people.
  • To bring about positive change in how disabled people are viewed in our society and to achieve inclusion for disabled people in Scotland.
  • To help and support other disability organisations and disabled individuals by offering practical advice on how to dismantle the barriers to inclusion.


Nothing About Us. Without Us.


Inclusion Scotland,
Hayweight House,
23 Lauriston Street,
Edinburgh, EH3 9DQ
Telephone logo 0131 281 0860
Email: email symbol info@inclusionscotland.org
we have a regularly updated website: www.inclusionscotland.org
You can also follow our work by ‘liking’ us on Facebook.
Facebook: facebook logo facebook.com/InclusionScotland
Instagram: Instagram Logo instagram.com/inclusionscotland
Twitter: Twitter Logo twitter.com/InclusionScot
Charity No. SC 031619


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Hello

National section logoIndependent Living in Scotland

Independent Living in Scotland logo


‘Independent living means disabled people of all ages having the same freedom, choice, dignity and control as other citizens at home, at work, and in the community. It does not mean living by yourself or fending for yourself. It means rights to practical assistance and support to participate in society and live an ordinary life.’


It includes things like the right to live without having to plan everything in advance; to go to school; to work or study in an inclusive environment; to have an adequate income; to take part in leisure activities; to be accepted as a full and active member of the community; and to have access to services that actually work together, delivered at the right time in the right way. It’s about being free to make your own decisions (perhaps with some assistance if you want it) about what you want to do and when you want to do it.



What is the Independent Living Movement?


The disabled people’s Independent Living Movement has grown in Scotland because disabled people believe that they are best placed to make decisions about their lives – not anyone else. The Movement challenges the individual approach taken by many organisations to solving the barriers, such as physical barriers or other people‘ attitudes, which disabled people face in their daily living. Often the solution achieved by the individual approach only benefits the person concerned.


More and more disabled individuals and organisations led by disabled people are coming together to make their voices heard. They are working collectively to change the policies and practices that disable them. They look for different ways to influence or even work alongside policy-makers and service-providers to design “joined-up” services to enable more choice for all disabled people.


The Movement in Scotland is made up of a range of organisations, networks and individuals.



The Independent Living in Scotland (ILiS) Project


ILiS is funded by the Scottish Government, hosted in the Equality and Human Rights Commission and steered by an expert group of disabled people. It aims to strengthen the Independent Living Movement and support disabled people to have their voices heard at national and local level so that decision-makers work with them to deliver independent living.


Independent Living in Scotland logo

For more information about ILiS,
visit www.ilis.co.uk
or write to
Independent Living in Scotland
Brunswick House
51 Wilson Street,
Glasgow G1 1UZ
Telephone logo 0141 559 5013 ext 3313
Email: email symbol contact@ilis.co.uk


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Hello

National section logoSAMH

SAMH Logo black text with 4 purple circlesEvery year 1 in 4 of us in Scotland will experience a mental health problem.


So it’s important to be ready to talk about mental health. Whether you are living with a mental health problem or supporting someone who is, accessing information is vital. SAMH is here to help you. Building a network of people who you can trust and share things with can help protect your mental health. A person you trust, such as a friend, family member, colleague or community leader, may be able to provide a listening ear.


If you are an employer, you have a responsibility to make sure you provide an environment that is healthy for all. And similarly, if you work in education, you want to be in the position to offer the right support to students with mental health problems.


It can be very difficult to see someone who you care about becoming distressed and unwell, but you don’t need to be an expert on mental health to offer support. Often, small everyday actions can make the biggest difference.


People will want support at different times in different ways, so ask how you can help. It might be useful to help them prepare for a doctor’s appointment. If your friend wants to get more exercise, you could do this together, or if your partner is affected by lack of sleep, you could help them get into a regular sleeping pattern.


Keep in mind that having a mental health problem is just one part of the person. People don’t want to be identified by their mental health problem, so keep talking about the things you always talked about.


SAMH is the Scottish Association for Mental Health.
Brunswick House,
51 Wilson Street,
Glasgow, G1 1UZ
www.samh.org.uk/
Telephone logo 0141 530 1000


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Midlothian Council section logoMidlothian Council Councillors


Name

Ward

Photo

Party

Diane Alexander
Telephone logo 0131 270 7500

Bonnyrigg

Diane Alexander

SNP
SNP Logo

Janet Lay-Douglas
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Bonnyrigg

Janet Lay-Douglas

Scottish Conservative
Scottish Conservitive logo

Derek Milligan
Telephone logo 0131 271 3055

Bonnyrigg

Derek Milligan

Scottish Labour
Scottish labour logo

Colin Cassidy
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Dalkeith

 colin Cassidy

SNP
SNP Logo

Stephan Curran
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Dalkeith

Stephan Curran

Scottish Labour
Scottish labour logo

Margot Russell
Telephone logo 0131 271 3087

Dalkeith

Margot Russell

Scottish Labour
Scottish labour logo

Kenneth Baird
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Midlothian
East

Kenneth Baird

SNP
SNP Logo

John Hacket
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Midlothian
East

John Hacket

Scottish Labour
Scottish labour logo

Peter Smaill
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Midlothian
East

Peter Small

Scottish Conservative
Scottish Conservitive logo

Catherine Johnstone
Telephone logo 0131 271 3092

Midlothian South

 catherine Johnstone

SNP
SNP Logo

Jim Muirhead
Telephone logo 0131 271 3055

Midlothian South

Jim Muirhead

Scottish Labour
Scottish labour logo

Kieran Munro
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Midlothian South

Kieran Munro

Scottish Conservative
Scottish Conservitive logo

Russell Imrie
Telephone logo 0131 271 3086

Midlothian West

Russell Imrie

Scottish Labour
Scottish labour logo

Kelly   Parry
Telephone logo 0131 271 3109

Midlothian West

Kelly Parry

SNP
SNP Logo

Pauline Winchester
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Midlothian West

Pauline Winchester

Scottish Conservative
Scottish Conservitive logo

Andrew Hardie
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Penicuik

Andrew Hardie

Scottish Conservative
Scottish Conservitive logo

Debbi McCall
Telephone logo 0131 271 7500

Penicuik

Debbi McCall image

SNP
SNP Logo

Joe Wallace
Telephone logo 0131 271 3018

Penicuik

Joe Wallace Image

SNP
SNP Logo



Midlothian council LogoTo Contact your local councillors please visit Midlothian council web site at: midlothian.cmis.uk.com/councillors.aspx for full contact details


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